Sometimes, you have to create a mockup with Photoshop when there is nothing else out there. In this tutorial, I’m going to walk you through the process of how I do it when I can’t find something online that will work to showcase your work.

Sometimes, you have to create a mockup with Photoshop when there is nothing else out there. In this tutorial, I'm going to walk you through the process of how I do it when I can't find something online that will work to showcase your work. Click to watch the video tutorial.

 

I have an extensive library of mockup files that I’ve downloaded for free or purchased on Creative Market or Graphic River. There are many amazing quality mockup files online. But, sometimes you aren’t so lucky – you can’t find the perfect mockup to use to showcase your art or surface pattern collections.

Often I will resort to using stock photos I’ve purchased. So today I’d like to show you just exactly how I do that!

Software I use to Create Mockups

I’m exclusive to using Adobe Photoshop for my mockup work. When using photos, that’s truly what Adobe Photoshop was made for.

I’ve seen surface pattern designers use Adobe Illustrator to create vector-based mockups. And, if you’re going for that look then stay with that look. Whatever method you choose for creating mockups, keep the look the same throughout your look book. Photos all the way, or vector all of the way.

I’m currently using Adobe Photoshop CC – or whatever the latest version is. For me, it’s more cost effective to have the Adobe Creative Cloud version. You can download a free trial of Photoshop if you’re on the fence on spending the money for it.

Where to Find Stock Photos

You can find stock photos on sites like Shutterstock.com and iStockphoto.com. If you want to find other images check out Creative Market.

Things to Consider When Choosing a Stock Image

When choosing an image to work with I put together a list of things to consider:

  • Choose images that will give you the most bang for your buck: images that have multiple items in them that you can incorporate more than one or two surface patterns or designs into will show how well they work together, but also save you from having to spend a lot of money on more stock images. An example: a bed with side lamps, and then throw pillows, but also frames for artwork above – and the wall for wallpaper.
  • Pick images that don’t have existing patterns: For example, if you’re working with a photo for bedding, look for something with a solid duvet or pillow. When you work with an image that has a pattern that exists already, you’re going to be spending a lot of time cloning those out. I have done it, but it’s not fun. Work smarter, not harder!
  • Make sure the images you choose fit the theme of your collection: you wouldn’t use a photo of an adult’s bedroom for a child’s pattern design, right?
  • Consider the photo’s orientation: if you’re doing a look book that is horizontal then use images that are horizontal and won’t be cut off the page.
  • White: if you can find images that feature white items then you’re going to ace this! But, I can show you a trick to make something white from a color.

Watch How to Create a Mockup with Photoshop 

I know this was a long post, but I hope that it helps you out in creating some better mockups for your portfolios. Honestly, it’s worth spending money on decent images for this. If you can afford to have things made and photographed, then I am so jealous!

Holly McCaig

About Holly McCaig

Hey you! I'm Holly McCaig and I'm super excited to help you love and ROCK your Etsy shop. I will help you have an amazing online presence so you can build a strong business and attract more customers to your shop. Let's do this together! Let's connect on Pinterest or Instagram, k?

About Holly McCaig

Hey you! I'm Holly McCaig and I'm super excited to help you love and ROCK your Etsy shop. I will help you have an amazing online presence so you can build a strong business and attract more customers to your shop. Let's do this together! Let's connect on Pinterest or Instagram, k?

8 Comments

  1. Shanna on January 23, 2016 at 11:32 am

    What a great tutorial. Have you considered doing a video tutorial version? I would LOVE to watch this happen.

    • Holly McCaig on January 23, 2016 at 6:17 pm

      Hi Shanna, I have it on my list of mini courses! 🙂

  2. Ann on January 25, 2016 at 12:14 pm

    Thanks for sharing your tips, I think I may even give it a try…:) I’ve been wanting to for awhile now to save on my budget -. Appreciate it.

    • Holly McCaig on January 25, 2016 at 12:27 pm

      Great! I will see about working on a video mini tutorial course on this too!

  3. Zane on May 24, 2016 at 12:10 am

    Thanks a lot !:) One of the nicest and most valuable photoshop tutorials I have seen 🙂

  4. Katherine on May 24, 2017 at 2:43 pm

    This was awesome. Super helpful and I’m already creating new content. Thank you!

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